Mainz: the history starts with the Romans who built a fort here

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Mainz

Mainz is one of the oldest cities in Germany

During its history Mainz was also part of France and is where Johannes Gutenberg invented the movable printing press.

I arrived in Mainz on Saturday and was met by a ton of people spending time in the old town.

I took the tram to Gutenbergplatz where I started my Sunday Stroll first meeting the man himself, Johannes Gutenberg.  This is also where I enjoyed a lovely glass of wine and amazing carrot soup the day before.

The old houses lining the street are equally magnificent and include the Gutenburg Museum which is housed in a fine palace known as Zum Romischer Kaiser (At the sign of the Roman Emperor).

This area is the center of the inner city and is overshadowed by the very large 1,000 year old Cathedral of Mainz.  Any stroll in the area will pass St. Boniface who was the first Archbishop of Mainz.

Following the streets you will reach the Rhine River with its views across to Weisbaden!

Can you go in a wonderful river cruise by boat.

Crossing back to the streets of Mainz led me to the Old Town. Strolling along Augustinerstrasse, which used to be the “main” street of Mainz, took me by beautiful half timbered houses and through an area that was once cherry orchards.  They call this area a strollers delight and I definitely could see why!

Continuing my stroll along Augustinerstrasse brought me to the fabulous Baroque façade of the Augustiner Church.  Dating back to 1768 and surviving World War II, the inside is as wonderful as the front.  Take a look at the amazing frescoes!

It was time to head up to St Stephan home to the famous Chagall blue stained glass windows.  As I twisted and turned my way up the hill, I was sure I was lost but then I saw the Gothic church peeking through an alley way.  The church itself simple but attractive on the outside but once you enter you’re met by a wonder calming blueness.  The Russian Jewish painter, Marc Chagall, made the windows from 1978-1985 and they are truly stunning!

Now it was time to head back to my hotel to get ready for dinner at Weinstube Hottum.  But before I stopped wandering, I strolled through Schillerplatz where I ran into the man himself along with the Carnival fountain, which is full of symbols and figures from the Mainz Carnival.  Schillerplatz is also lined with some beautiful buildings from the 1700’s – the Baroque Osteiner Hof and Bassenheimer Hof are two great examples of the architectural style of the day!

When I first arrived in Mainz, I wasn’t too sure how I felt the city.

By the time I finished my Sunday Stroll, I had fallen in love with this beautiful city on the Rhine! Mainz is a wonderful German city full of life and vitality.  It is also a short 30 minute train ride to Frankfurt airport so it would make a great beginning or ending to any trip to Germany.

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